The Resistors by Dwight L. Wilson

“Wilson’s (The Kidnapped, 2018, etc.) new volume of historical fiction weaves together 24 short stories to create a remarkable, multihued portrait of America.” “Memorable characters and unique historical details illuminate slavery’s complex legacy.” — Kirkus Reviews

$21.99

20 in stock

SKU: 978-1-947041-36-3

Description

The Resistors is a parallel sequel to 2018’s The Kidnapped. It focuses on blacks, whites, and Native Americans resisting pre-Civil War oppression while attempting to establish dignified identities. It is also in the voice of Sarah, one of the author’s direct ancestors. She was the daughter of Esi and Kofi two fictionalized Fante kidnapped from West Africa in 1795. With the help of Quakers, together with two brothers, Robin and Dan, Sarah escaped from being enslaved in Culpeper, Virginia and settled in Warren County, Ohio where she met and married the Scots-Irish Quaker, Charles Ferguson. It is imagined that Sarah was primarily educated by her father who himself was taught reading and writing by Nathan Prescott, his slave master, and secondarily through two years of education at Goose Creek Friends School, a Quaker school in Northern Virginia, renown for being integrated prior to Nat Turner’s revolt which led to state laws forbidding the education of people of color.

Reviews

“Wilson’s (The Kidnapped, 2018, etc.) new volume of historical fiction weaves together 24 short stories to create a remarkable, multihued portrait of America.” “Memorable characters and unique historical details illuminate slavery’s complex legacy.” — Kirkus Reviews

Once again, Dwight Wilson has written stirring stories that teach us essential history about our country and about ourselves — all while we are looking the other way, captivated by his tales and characters from our shared past. — From Laura Danforth, Head of School, The Masters School, Dobbs Ferry, NY

“The Resistors” is a reminder that time does not separate us from our ancestors, but instead connects us — their errors, their sorrows, and their redemptive acts of courage. Telling stories of people who lived, breathed, and suffered long ago, Dwight Wilson brings them to life in his readers’ hearts — and somehow in the process we comfort their spirits and they comfort ours. — Paula B. Chu, Ph.D.

“To call our ancestors forth to witness is a noble pursuit. Through characters, real and imagined, Wilson gives us the wisdom of ancestry and the gift of story. It is our stories that carry us through the danger water and heal our broken places. This human rights parable is a sweeping trek through the American historical landscape that brings us to back to center.” — Carla R. Young, Director of Community & Multicultural Programs, Cranbrook Schools

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